Hannah Kate

poet, short story writer and editor based in Manchester

April 23, 2019

North Manchester FM: Hannah’s Bookshelf, Saturday 27 April, 2-4pm

Join me on Saturday at 2pm for another episode of Hannah’s Bookshelf on North Manchester FM. This week, my guest will be the brill Benjamin Guilfoyle – the Woolly Hat Poet.

Benjamin is a woolly hat wearing performance poet. His unique brand of wonderfully warm, woolly and often silly words has seen him headline poetry nights all across the North of England. His poetry covers all bases from ‘cinema eaters’ to the life teachings of Brian Blessed. In 2015 he self-published his first poetry pamphlet, Level Up, and is currently working on his first poetry collection, Please Insert Disk 2, which is due to be released at some point in 2019.

Benjamin loves nothing more than to perform his poetry to a live audience and in 2019 is taking his poetry on the road with ‘The Wandering Poet Tour’. The tour will be to raise money for the Lancaster Homeless Shelter and the Lancaster Children’s Library. Benjamin will walk from Lancaster to Brighouse performing poetry in twelve towns along the way with support from local poets and performers. As part of his other poetry projects in 2019, Benjamin is working with the Morecambe Exchange to make a short film from one of his poems all about pilates. He is also animating some poetry with the help of Cumbrian animator Hannah Fox.

I’ll be chatting to Benjamin about his writing, performance and tour on this week’s show. And, of course, he’ll be sharing his selections for this week’s Apocalypse Books.

Catch the show on Saturday at 2pm on 106.6FM (if you’re in the North Manchester area) or listen online (if you’re further afield).

April 22, 2019

North Manchester FM: A Helping of History, Tuesday 23 April, 12-2pm

Join me on Tuesday at 12 for another Helping of History on North Manchester FM. As it’ll be St George’s Day on Tuesday, it seems only fitting that this week’s show will be reporting on this year’s Middleton Pace Egg play, which was performed on Easter Monday.

Pace Egg plays are an old Easter tradition, thought to be derived from the medieval mystery play tradition. Although the Pace Egg tradition largely died out during WWI, several places now stage a revived version… and Middleton is one of those places. Now in its 53rd year, the Middleton Pace Egg play tells the story of St George fighting the Turkish Champion in defence of the King of England. It isn’t historical accurate (or PC, to be honest), but the play follows the old Easter tradition of having St George killed, and then brought back from the dead by a rather eccentric doctor. The play is performed in (and, weather-permitting, out) of various pubs in Middleton, every Easter Monday.

I’ll be reporting on this year’s play, sharing some snippets of the action and song, and chatting to the cast about their roles in this very quirky Middleton tradition.

As well as this, I’ll also be taking my usual look through Yesterday’s Papers.

Catch the show on Tuesday at 12 on 106.6FM (if you’re in the North Manchester area) or listen online (if you’re further afield).

April 9, 2019

North Manchester FM: Hannah’s Bookshelf, Saturday 20 April, 2-4pm

Join me on Saturday at 2pm on North Manchester FM for another episode of Hannah’s Bookshelf. This week, my guest will be the brill B.L. Faulkner.

Crime writer B.L. Faulkner was born into a family of petty criminals in Herne Hill, South London, his father, uncle and elder brothers running with the notorious Richardson gang in the 60s-80s. He did not follow in that family tradition, although the characters he met and their escapades he witnessed have added a certain authenticity to his books. Faulkner attended the first ever comprehensive school in the UK, William Penn in Peckham and East Dulwich, where he attained no academic qualifications other than GCE O-levels in Art and English and a Prefect’s badge. His early writing career was as a copywriter with the major US advertising agency Erwin Wasey Ruthrauff & Ryan in Paddington, during which time he got lucky with some light entertainment scripts sent to the BBC and Independent Television and became a script editor and writer on a freelance basis. He worked on most of the LE shows of the 1980-90s and as personal writer to Bob Monkhouse, Tom O’Connor and others. During that period, while living out of a suitcase in UK hotels for a lot of the time, he filled many notebooks with DCS Palmer case plots.

In 2015, Faulkner finally found time to start putting the DCS Palmer plots in order and into book form. Seven are finished and published so far, with number 8 at the editors. As a crime writer, Faulkner is quite particular about ‘getting it right’, and he publishes a page called UK Crime Readers and Writers Page, which has much information about the forensic crime detection methods, police procedurals and other facts of use to both reader and writer of crime and detective books.

I’ll be talking to B.L. Faulkner about his writing, the DCS Palmer series, and about crime writing in general. And, of course, he’ll be sharing his selections for this week’s Apocalypse Books.

Catch the show on Saturday at 2pm on 106.6FM (if you’re in the North Manchester area) or listen online (if you’re further afield).

Missed the show? You can catch it again here:

April 9, 2019

North Manchester FM: A Helping of History, Tuesday 16 April, 12-2pm

Join me on Tuesday at 12 for another Helping of History on North Manchester FM. This week, I’ll be talking about some of the more curious place names in North Manchester.

Quite often on the show, I talk about the origin of place names (e.g. Crumpsall, Langley, Moston), but these are usually toponyms derived from physical features of the landscape and location. However, I’m also interested in another type of place name – one that refer to the function or purpose to which people have put the location. Sometimes, this purpose has been near-forgotten, but the name remains as a hint of the fascinating local history story to be uncovered.

I’ll be sharing four of my favourite place names and their stories on this week’s show. Tune in to find out about a tower block in Collyhurst, an odd little street in Blackley, an area of Moston… and perhaps the most anticipated street ever to be built in North Manchester!

Find out more about these curious little tales on this week’s show. In addition to this, I’ll also be taking my usual look through Yesterday’s Papers.

Catch the show on Tuesday at 12 on 106.6FM (if you’re in the North Manchester area) or listen online (if you’re further afield).

Missed the show? You can catch it again here:

April 9, 2019

North Manchester FM: Hannah’s Bookshelf, Saturday 13 April, 2-4pm

Tune in on Saturday at 2pm for more from Hannah’s Bookshelf on North Manchester FM. This week, my guest will be the wonderful Jack Barrow.

Jack lives in Hertfordshire, where he writes about popular philosophy in modern life. He has a particular interest in the way people are creating their own philosophies from the bottom up. He tries to bring an intellectual rigour to this field instead of merely accepting any old idea.

His first novel, The Hidden Masters and the Unspeakable Evil, is available worldwide following excellent UK reviews. It was described as ‘riotously funny and improbably probable’ by Pentacle Magazine. Jack’s latest project is a travelogue, In SatNav We Trust – A Search for Meaning Through the Historic Counties of England, a journey through ideas or science and belief, all the while searching for meaning and a bed for the night. Or is that the other way around?

I’ll be talking to Jack about his novel, his travelogue and about writing in general. And, of course, he’ll be sharing her selections for this week’s Apocalypse Books.

Catch the show on Saturday at 2pm on 106.6FM (if you’re in the North Manchester area) or listen online (if you’re further afield).

Missed the show? You can catch it again here:

April 9, 2019

North Manchester FM: A Helping of History, Tuesday 9 April, 12-2pm

Join me on Tuesday at 12 for another Helping of History on North Manchester FM. This week, I’ll be talking about the curious portion of Middleton (or is it Manchester?) that is Langley.

I say ‘curious’, because Langley’s history is often misunderstood. In fact, you would be forgiven for thinking that it had no history until the building of a large council estate in the 1950s. But on Tuesday’s show, I’m going to look right back to the medieval beginnings of the Langley Estate, through various changes in ownership, to its redevelopment as an overspill estate for Manchester Corporation (that’s right, Manchester Corporation) in the 1950s.

The Langley Estate sits in between Bowlee and Middleton, and for many centuries was connected to various landed Middleton families. It is now included as part of Middleton, which is in turn part of Rochdale Metropolitan Borough. However, from the 50s to the 70s, Langley Estate was a Manchester Corporation housing estate. On this week’s show, I’ll be discussing how (and why) that happened, and how that fits into the bigger picture of Langley’s curious history.

As well as this little look at Langley, I’ll also be taking my usual look through Yesterday’s Papers.

Catch the show on Tuesday at 12 on 106.6FM (if you’re in the North Manchester area) or listen online (if you’re further afield).

Missed the show? You can catch it again here:

April 2, 2019

North Manchester FM: Hannah’s Bookshelf, Saturday 6 April, 2-4pm

Tune in the North Manchester FM on Saturday at 2pm for more from Hannah’s Bookshelf. This week, my guest will be the fab Madeleine Gomez.

Born in the Dominican Republic, raised in Chicago and currently living in Miami, Latina Madeleine Gomez wrote her first poem in 5th grade and hasn’t stopped writing poetry since. She won her first poetry contest in her teens. Since then, she has produced 4 volumes of poetry. Following her book, Love Poems for the New Millennium (2010-2014), illustrated with the art of master calligrapher Beth Lee as well as linocuts by esteemed Chicano artist Bob Rob Medina, her recent and third book of published poems, Three (2018), was awarded semi-finalist in the prestigious biennial Latino Andres Montoya Poetry Competition (University of Notre Dame).

In addition to writing poetry, Madeleine is a song writer, vocalist and Flamenco dancer. In her late twenties, she began collaborating (as Pepper Gomez) with DJ-producer Matt Warren, and her lyrics and voice found a home accompanying the various projects and DJs on the nascent Sunset Records. In 2017, Madeleine’s love of Flamenco and other non-mainstream or lesser-known musical genres resulted in the creation of Wake Up! Music. Madeleine’s Spanish and English lyrics can be found on the first two releases: Elena Andujar’s Flamenco In Time and Matt Warren’s Music is My Life.

I’ll be talking to Madeleine about her poetry, lyrics and other creative work. And, of course, she’ll be sharing her selections for this week’s Apocalypse Books.

Catch the show on Saturday at 2pm on 106.6FM (if you’re in the North Manchester area) or listen online (if you’re further afield).

Missed the show? You can catch it again here:

April 2, 2019

North Manchester FM: A Helping of History, Tuesday 2 April, 12-2pm

Join me on Tuesday at 12 for another Helping of History on North Manchester FM. This week, I’ll be going back to one of my favourite topics… the incorporation of North Manchester townships in the nineteenth century.

On this week’s show, I’m going to be focusing on Crumpsall. You may remember that most recently I talked about the proposed incorporation of Failsworth into Manchester at the beginning of the twentieth century. Well, the incorporation of Crumpsall in 1890 was quite a different story! Far from being seduced to ‘amalgamate’ with Manchester, Crumpsall was put under a bit more pressure to make a decision. I’ll be talking about some of the discussions that took place in the township in the years prior to 1890. Tune in to the show to find out how Crumpsall ended up as part of Manchester.

As well as this, I’ll be taking my weekly look through Yesterday’s Papers.

Catch the show on Tuesday at 12 on 106.6FM (if you’re in the North Manchester area) or listen online (if you’re further afield).

Missed the show? You can catch it again here:

March 24, 2019

North Manchester FM: Hannah’s Bookshelf, Saturday 30 March, 2-4pm

Join me on Saturday at 2pm for another Hannah’s Bookshelf on North Manchester FM. This week, my guest will be the lovely Pamela Turton.

At the age of six, Pamela was already writing proper stories, all essentially medieval romances. She was spurred on by winning a prize in a Brooke Bond (the Tea Company) creative writing competition a few years later. Being mocked by Big Sister for waking up in the middle of the night to scribble poetry, and brought to the Headmaster’s office for using the word ‘voluptuous’ in a poem she submitted to the Catholic primary school magazine did not deter her.

Member of a huge Northern tribe, Manchester native, mum and teacher-turned-author, Pamela has now published five novels: So Sister, Selling Short, The Life Coach Less Travelled, Blue is the Object and Stalkbook, as well as poetry and non-fiction.

I’ll be talking to Pamela about her novels, poetry and other writing on this week’s show. And, of course, she’ll be sharing her selections for this week’s Apocalypse Books.

Catch the show on Saturday at 2pm on 106.6FM (if you’re in the North Manchester area) or listen online (if you’re further afield).

Missed the show? You can catch it again here:

March 24, 2019

North Manchester FM: A Helping of History, Tuesday 26 March, 12-2pm

Join me on Tuesday at 12 on North Manchester FM for another Helping of History. I’ve got two fantastic (though very different!) interviews for you on this week’s show.

In the first hour, I’ll be talking to author Denise Beddows about her latest book, The Cheetham Hill Murder: A Convenient Killing? The book reexamines the case of the murder of Frances Levin in 1933. Sparking what was described as Manchester CID’s ‘biggest manhunt’, the murder of Mrs Levin shocked the community of Cheetham Hill at the time. The police identified a homeless man William Burtoft as a likely suspect, and he was eventually tried and executed for the crime. However, as the BBC’s Murder, Mystery and My Family show revealed last year, it’s unlikely Burtoft could have committed the crime. Denise’s book picks up the story, reexamines the evidence, and pieces together the real story of what happened on that July afternoon in 1933.

I’ll be chatting to Denise on the show about the book, and about what inspired her to look into this particular case.

And then in the second hour, I’ll be talking to Sam Jenkins of the People’s History Museum about the new exhibition: Disrupt? Peterloo and Protest. This exhibition takes visitors through the past, present and future of protest, beginning with the story of the Peterloo Massacre, which is told through original artefacts. PHM’s collection, newly acquired pieces, donations and loan items are brought together for the first time, some never having been on public display before, to tell this story in the year of the 200th anniversary of the Peterloo Massacre in The National Lottery Heritage Fund supported exhibition.

I visited the exhibition and talked to Sam about the pieces on display, the story they reveal, and the ways this new exhibition interacts with the longer history of protest and demonstration – not only in Manchester, but across the globe.

Of course, as well as these two fantastic guests, I’ll also be taking my usual look through Yesterday’s Papers on the show.

Missed the show? You can catch it again here:

Catch A Helping of History on Tuesday at 12 on 106.6FM (if you’re in the North Manchester area) or listen online (if you’re further afield).