Hannah Kate

poet, short story writer and editor based in Manchester

July 12, 2018

North Manchester FM: Hannah’s Bookshelf, Saturday 14 July, 2-4pm

Tune in to North Manchester FM on Saturday at 2pm for another episode of Hannah’s Bookshelf. This week, it’s another transatlantic interview, and my guests will be the awesome And I Thought Ladies, Wilnona and Jade.

Wilnona and Jade are Advocate-awarded authors. They have contributed writings to ten books over two years. They are the co-founders of the Inspirational Women in Literature, Media and Journalism Conference and the Thoughtful Book Festival. They star in the docuseries show Just Writin Life that can be seen on Amazon, and they’re the editors of The 25 Hottest Indie Authors, Artists, and Advocates Magazine and Thoughtful literary magazine. International speakers, they have co-hosted conferences on three continents in the last year. They also write for Choices Magazine in their spare time.

I’ll be chatting to Jade and Wilnona about their books, events and magazines (and about why they’re not sure about using the word ‘awesome’). And, of course, they’ll be sharing their selections for this week’s Apocalypse Books.

Catch the show on Saturday at 2pm on 106.6FM (if you’re in the North Manchester area) or listen online (if you’re further afield).

July 4, 2018

North Manchester FM: Hannah’s Bookshelf, Saturday 7 July, 2-4pm

Join me on Saturday at 2pm on North Manchester FM for another edition of Hannah’s Bookshelf. This week, I’ll be catching up on some of my favourite interviews I’ve done over the past month.

I’ll be playing interviews with poets, editors, actors and writers – giving you chance to catch up with some of the great stories you may have missed first time round. I’ll be live in the studio, so you can text in with your comments and questions throughout the show.

Tune in on Saturday at 2pm on 106.6FM (if you’re in the North Manchester area) or listen online (if you’re further afield).

Missed the show? You can catch it again here:

July 2, 2018

North Manchester FM: A Helping of History, Tuesday 3 July, 12-2pm

Tune in to North Manchester FM on Tuesday at 12 for another Helping of History – talking about the stories that have shaped the place we live.

This week, I’m going to be talking about a few local history books that feature stories of North Manchester. Since I started presenting this show back in October I’ve been sent/lent quite a few new (and not-so-new) books about Manchester’s history, most of which have some interesting stories about our local area. This Tuesday, I’ll be talking about a few of these, and sharing my recommendations.

As always, I’ll also be taking a look through Yesterday’s Papers. And you can pit your wits against the Who Am I? quiz – just how well do you know North Manchester’s landmark buildings?

Catch the show on Tuesday at 12 on 106.6FM (if you’re in the North Manchester area) or listen online (if you’re further afield).

Missed the show? You can catch it again here:

June 23, 2018

North Manchester FM: Hannah’s Bookshelf, Saturday 30 June, 2-4pm

Tune in to Hannah’s Bookshelf on North Manchester FM on Saturday 30th June for a Greater Manchester Fringe Special! The Greater Manchester Fringe is a multi-venue open access arts festival, which takes place across Greater Manchester throughout July. There are hundreds of performances on this year’s programme (across 30 venues)  – on this week’s show I’ll be talking to some of the writers, directors and performers who are taking part.

Here’s what’s coming up on the show…

Once a Year on Blackpool Sands

Set in Blackpool 1953, not long after the Coronation, this real-life true story is packed with gritty northern comedy coupled with a heartbreaking emotional punch. Yorkshire miners and secret lovers Eddie and Tommy head to Blackpool with most of their town for the annual wakes holiday. As events unfold, Eddie will reveal a shocking truth, leading to his lifetime fight for LGBT Pride. I spoke to cast members Wendy Laurence James (Gladys), Macaulay Cooper (Tommy) and Kyle Brookes (Eddie).

A Surgeon’s Photograph

Rising Shadows Productions brings the premiere of this musical to the Greater Manchester Fringe 2018. In 1956 Robert’s father disappeared after a storm ravaged Loch Ness, 20 years later he is seeking answers. Haunted by the myth of the monster and facing questions of faith, sexuality and trust, the story is told with a mesmerising original score. I spoke to producer Ella Dufton to find out more.

Pronoun Trouble

While sitting in a lecture about a series of Chuck Jones cartoons, Ben’s thoughts drift off in various directions. Pronoun Trouble combines a fact-adjacent lecture about three great films with a ton of other topics that sometimes come to mind. I spoke to writer and performer Ben Moor about the show.

 

King Lear (alone)

Join one of Shakespeare’s most famous characters on the heath as he battles his demons to come to terms with the destruction of his world and his own contribution to those tragic events. Using Shakespeare’s original words alongside new dialogue from writer/director Frank Bramwell, this unique and fascinating one-man play has captivated audiences throughout the UK. Now in it’s fourth year with Bob Young as Lear, the play returns to Manchester for 5 performances before moving on to the Edinburgh festival in August. I spoke to actor Bob Young.

The Big Things

The Big Things brings us into the world of Grace, a woman living to a different rhythm. When she and Malcolm decide to have a baby, the ensuing challenges leave her questioning everything she knows about life. Shortlisted for the BBC Alfred Bradley Bursary Award 2016, The Big Things is a tragi-comic play about love, parenthood, and defining and defying what it means to be normal. I talked to writer Mike Heath to find out more.

The Black Stuff

Rubber – a miraculous substance! But until Charles Goodyear came along in the 1830s, it was sticky and useless. In a race against his rivals and battling incredible odds, Charles turned natural rubber into a product that revolutionised industries around the world. Through theatre, art, humour and song, The Black Stuff tells the dark true story of how a bankrupt button-maker became one of the most important inventors of all time – and the terrible price he and his family paid for it. I chatted to writer/composer Holl Morrell, director Liz Kearney and narrator Andy Pilkington about the show.

On Behalf of the People

A powerful and engaging story of a post-war Yorkshire mining family coming to terms with their rapidly changing world and a new Britain, told with warmth, humour and authenticity. Tom Mason returns from the war to the arms of his grateful mother and fiancée – and to the bosom of the pit. On Behalf of The People is based on true stories and extensive research and was originally commissioned by the National Coal Mining Museum for England. I caught up with writer Ray Castleton to find out more.

Janet

Janet is an emotional, high-energy, poetically performed tragi-comedy, celebrating the life of Janet. A quirky look at trying to defy the inevitable and the struggle to be oneself using objects and unconventional puppetry (Janet herself is played by a lump of uncooked bread dough). A very human story told by objects with a dark comic edge – think Emmerdale meets Monty Python, plus a little B-Movie Horror.

Cheaters: A Play About Infidelity

One sordid evening, non-bachelors Kevin and Dave bring two married ladies back to their house for an evening of pre-meditated adultery. But very quickly things do not go according to plan… Echoing the classic farces by the likes of Noel Coward, but updated for modern audiences, Cheaters is a frantic, silly and raunchy take on marriage, monogamy, and infidelity. I talked to writer Lewis Charlesworth and actor Rosie Charlesworth about the show.

 

The Love Calculator

If ‘proximity x tolerance over time = relationship’ then surely there’s a formula for true love? Join Rosa as she uses playground maths and poetry to explore her misadventures in multiplication (and the inevitable divisions) as she attempts to find and carry The One… I caught up with writer/performer Rosa Wright to find out more about the show.

Hanging

One room. Two executioners. A convict, a man, his family. A big fat show. Tangled Theatre presents Hanging, M.W. Biasioli’s best-known tragicomedy. 7 and a half characters are reflecting on your existence. Looking for entertainment. Looking for a victim. I caught up with producer Elena Spagnuolo and actor Jasmine Oates to talk about the show.

 

Paisley

Paisley is a deeply personal piece of theatre focusing on culture and its development from a woman’s perspective. Set in the intimate space of the bedroom, it explores the societal problems placed upon us and the lingering scars left behind on our psyches. Paisley is about women supporting each other through real-life issues that a makeover can’t fix. I talked to writer/director/producer Andre Anderson to find out about the show.

You can hear all of these interviews on Saturday at 2pm on 106.6FM (if you’re in the North Manchester), or listen online (if you’re further afield).

Missed the show? You can catch it again here:

June 22, 2018

North Manchester FM: A Helping of History, Tuesday 26 June, 12-2pm

Join me on Tuesday at 12 on North Manchester FM for another Helping of History. Last week, I talked about Queen’s Park, one of the oldest public parks in Manchester. This week, we’re looking at more recent park history, as I’ll be reporting from the Herristone Park 50th Anniversary Picnic in the Park.

Herristone Park in Crumpsall opened to the public in 1968, when it was opened by Matt Busby. It’s a small urban park, with a children’s play area and games area. Each year, the Friends of Herristone Park hold a summer Picnic in the Park. This year’s event, to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the parks opening, featured Crumpsall Concert Band, plants stalls and bric-a-brac, games, an animal show and other attractions. I talked to some of the organizers and guests about the history of the park and its significance for the area. You can hear my interviews on Tuesday’s show!

As always, I’ll also be reading Yesterday’s Papers. And you can pit your wits against the Who Am I? quiz – just how well do you know North Manchester’s landmark buildings?

Catch the show on Tuesday at 12 on 106.6FM (if you’re in the North Manchester area) or listen online (if you’re further afield).

Missed the show? You can catch it again here:

June 17, 2018

North Manchester FM: A Helping of History, Tuesday 19 June, 12-2pm

Tune in to North Manchester FM on Tuesday at 12 for another Helping of History. This week, I’m going to be delving into the history of a green space very close to the NMFM studio… Queen’s Park in Harpurhey.

First opened in 1846, Queen’s Park on Rochdale Road is one of the oldest public parks in Manchester. The land was once owned by the Houghton family, who built Hendham Hall on the site. I’ll be talking about some of the park’s fascinating (and significant) history – both before and after its purchase by Manchester Corporation in the 1840s.

As well as the Queen’s Park chat, I’ll be taking my usual look through Yesterday’s Papers. And, as always, you can pit your wits against the Who Am I? quiz – just how well do you know North Manchester’s landmark buildings?

Catch the show on Tuesday at 12 on 106.6FM (if you’re in the North Manchester area) or listen online (if you’re further afield).

Missed the show? You can listen again here:

June 16, 2018

North Manchester FM: Hannah’s Bookshelf, Saturday 23 June, 2-4pm

Join me on Saturday at 2pm for more from Hannah’s Bookshelf on North Manchester FM. This week, I’ll be joined by the fab Catherine Burns. Catherine is the author of The Visitors, a dark and unsettling psychological thriller set on the outskirts of a northern seaside resort.

Born in Chorlton (a long time ago, before it got trendy), Catherine went to Oakwood High School then Xavarian Sixth Form college in Rusholme. Her mum was the school caretaker at Oakwood and her dad was a communist shop steward – they used to support the Soviet Union in the Olympics. Briefly rebelling against her Marxist upbringing, she went to Trinity College Cambridge then became a bond trader in the City. After a few years of those Thatcherite shenanigans she decided to move to Moscow and study at the Kino Institute then came back to the UK and taught at uni for a bit. To drag herself out of a bout of depression when her mum died, she started writing The Visitors. She was writing really just to have a reason to get out of bed in the morning and never thought she would get a publishing deal. She was totally amazed when the book was picked up by Legend Press in the UK, Simon and Schuster in the USA, Hachette in Australia (also coming soon in the Czech Republic!).

I’ll be chatting to Catherine about The Visitors, writing and publishing. And, of course, she’ll be sharing her selections for this week’s Apocalypse Books.

Tune in on Saturday at 2pm on 106.6FM (if you’re in the North Manchester area) or listen online (if you’re further afield).

Missed the show? You can catch it again here:

June 10, 2018

North Manchester FM: Hannah’s Bookshelf, Saturday 16 June, 2-4pm

Tune in to North Manchester FM on Saturday at 2pm for another episode of Hannah’s Bookshelf. This week, my guest will be the fab Ruth Estevez.

Ruth lives in Manchester, although she travels frequently over the Pennines to her native Yorkshire. Ruth has always worked in the arts, from Opera North, Harrogate Theatre-in-Education Company to Emmerdale. Her attitude of saying ‘yes’ to offers means Ruth has worked in places from Pitlochry Festival Theatre in Scotland to Shakespeare’s Globe in London. She always wanted to be an actor and studied English and Drama at Chester University, appearing as Nell Gwynne, a nun and Madame from Jean Genet’s The Maids in her final year. Acting stood her in good stead for her writing, co-writing a day long performance/workshop, The Ghost in the Machine, for Harrogate T.I.E before moving to television and becoming a scriptwriter on the BBC puppet animated series, Bob the Builder. However, it seemed acting wasn’t to be as she was drawn increasingly to writing.

Since a young age, Ruth had always made up her own worlds and characters and eventually, this love of writing won out and she wrote the novel, Meeting Coty, based on her great aunt who worked in the perfume industry in the 1920s, published by Kings Hart Books in 2007. She self-published her second novel, Erosion, whilst working as an Associate Lecturer in Scriptwriting at Manchester Metropolitan University on the BA (Hons) Film and Contemporary Video Degree Course. Ruth’s first YA novel, Jiddy Vardy, will be published by ZunTold on 21st of June 2018, and she is currently working on her second YA novel, The Monster Belt.

I’ll be talk to Ruth about her novels, and we’ll be chatting about all things creative writing. And, of course, Ruth will be sharing her selections for this week’s Apocalypse Books.

Catch the show on Saturday at 2pm on 106.6FM (if you’re in the North Manchester area) or listen online (if you’re further afield).

Missed the show? You can listen again here:

June 9, 2018

North Manchester FM: A Helping of History, Tuesday 12 June, 12-2pm

Join me on Tuesday at 12 on North Manchester FM for another Helping of History. This week, I have two fantastic guests (from either end of North Manchester) in the studio. In the first hour of the show, I’ll be joined by Christine Grime of the Edgar Wood Society, and then in the second, I’ll be welcoming Richard Long from the Friends of Angel Meadow.

Edgar Wood (1860-1935) was the most advanced English architect of his generation, stylistically moving through through art nouveau, vernacular, expressionist and finally art deco phases a decade or more before other designers. His buildings are mostly clustered in the towns of Middleton, Rochdale, Oldham, Huddersfield and Hale. The Edgar Wood Society was formed in April 2011 to promote the architecture, furniture, paintings and other work of Edgar Wood and his role in the developing Arts & Crafts movement. In particular the Society seeks to restore and secure the future of the Arts and Crafts Church, Long Street Methodist Church and Schools, Edgar Wood’s masterpiece in Middleton.

St Michael’s Flags and Angel Meadow Park is situated on the northern edge of Manchester city centre of Manchester. St Michael’s Church once stood on the site and artist L.S. Lowry depicted the area in several of his paintings. The site was home to Angel Meadow, a notorious Victorian slum. In 2004, the Friends of Angel Meadow formed to campaign for the park’s continued redevelopment, and since then considerable money has been raised through grants and Manchester City Council interest. The Friends group actively encourages preservation, fundraising and social events.

Two brilliant guests – two significant stories in our local area’s history!

As always, I’ll also be taking a look through Yesterday’s Papers. And you can pit your wits against the Who Am I? quiz – just how well do you know North Manchester’s landmark buildings?

Catch the show on Tuesday at 12 on 106.6FM (if you’re in the North Manchester area) or listen online (if you’re further afield).

Missed the show? You can listen again here:

June 4, 2018

North Manchester FM: Hannah’s Bookshelf, Saturday 9 June, 2-4pm

Tune in to North Manchester FM on Saturday at 2pm for more from Hannah’s Bookshelf. This week, I’m welcoming the lovely Caroline England to the studio. You may remember that Caroline was first on the show back in October, talking about her debut novel Beneath the Skin.

Born a Yorkshire lass, Caroline studied Law at the University of Manchester and stayed over the border, working in the city centre as a divorce lawyer. In addition to her short story collection, Watching Horsepats Feed the Roses, Caroline has had dark twisty short stories and poems published in a variety of literary magazines and anthologies. Caroline draws on her legal career to write about secrets, betrayal and lies, hidden crime and ‘what goes on behind closed doors’. Her debut ‘domestic noir’ novel, Beneath the Skin, was published by Avon HarperCollins in October 2017 and My Husband’s Lies followed on 17th May 2018.

I’ll be catching up with Caroline, and finding out all about My Husband’s Lies.

But there’s more… as bonus content on this week’s show, I also have two fantastic extra interviews for you.

I caught up with the amazing Yrsa Daley-Ward, whose poetic memoir The Terrible has just been published by Penguin Random House. Poet, writer, actor and model, Yrsa had her debut poetry collection, bone, published last year. She’s followed that up with The Terrible, a lyrical memoir of growing up, faith, race, sexuality and mental health. I chaired the Manchester date of Yrsa’s book tour at Waterstones on Deansgate, and we took the opportunity to record an interview for the show.

I’ll also be talking to the great people at Salford Arts Theatre about their new production of Harold Brighouse’s Hobson’s Choice, which is on until 23rd June. Set in Salford in the 1880s, Hobson’s Choice is the story of shoemaker Henry Hobson, and his put-upon (but sharp as a whip) daughter Maggie. This new production is staged by Salford Theatre Company, the Arts Theatre’s inhouse professional company. I went to chat with them ahead of the press performance to find out more.

To hear all three of these interviews, catch the show on Saturday at 2pm on 106.6FM (if you’re in the North Manchester area) or listen online (if you’re further afield).

Missed the show? You can catch it again here: