Hannah Kate

poet, short story writer and editor based in Manchester

October 21, 2020

North Manchester FM: Hannah’s Bookshelf, Saturday 24 October, 2-4pm

Join me on Saturday at 2pm on North Manchester FM for more News, Reviews and (for this week) More Reviews on Hannah’s Bookshelf. Here’s what’s coming up on this week’s show…

A review of a novel by C.J. Harter I’ll be talking about C.J. Harter’s novel Fitful Head, which was published in 2018 (and which I spoke to C.J. about when I interviewed her).

A review of an audio drama by The Alternative Stories and Fake Realities podcast I’ll be reviewing Hare Spell, a new audio drama written by Fay Hield, Terri Windling, Sarah Hesketh and Sarra Culleno.

Reviews of two radio plays from JustOut Theatre I’ve chosen two more plays from the JustOut Stays In radio play series to talk about on this week’s show: Mother’s Day by Tom Ryder and Monday at the Flat Iron by Kate Ireland.

And a review of a novel by Julian Edge I’m also going to be talking about Blindsided, which came out in April this year.

Plus… you can hear my weekly round-up of news from the World of Words. If you’ve got a news story you’d like to share, please use the News Form to submit it to the show. For review requests, please get in touch via the Contact Form.

Catch Hannah’s Bookshelf on Saturday at 2pm on 106.6FM (if you’re in the North Manchester area) or listen online (if you’re further afield).

Missed the show? You can catch it again here:

October 18, 2020

Literary Nostalgia: Back to 1996!

On Saturday’s Hannah’s Bookshelf on North Manchester FM, I indulged in a bit of literary nostalgia – going back to 1996! 1996 was an interesting year (for good and bad reasons)… football was coming home (for the first time), Manchester suffered a devastating IRA bomb in the city centre, and it looked like The Sun was on the verge of backing the Labour Party for the first time. Oh, and I finished my A-Levels and left college!

For those of us of a certain age, 1996 feels like a bit of a landmark year, so I thought it would be interesting (given, you know, 2020 and stuff) to see how the world of fiction looked in ’96. Rather than picking (necessarily) the best-selling books, I’ve chosen a mixture of iconic titles and stories that capture that specifically mid-90s vibe.

Do you agree with my choices? Have I missed out your favourite? Let me know in the comments!

Alias Grace by Margaret Atwood

Alias Grace is a fictionalized version of the real-life (such as is known) story of the murders of Thomas Kinnear and his housekeeper Nancy Montgomery in Canada in 1843. Two servants, Grace Marks and James McDermott were convicted of the murders (McDermott was hanged and Marks was sentenced to life imprisonment), and Atwood’s novel focuses on the story of Grace Marks and the question mark over her level of involvement in the murders. Atwood was inspired by the historical account in Susanna Moodie’s book Life in the Clearings Versus the Bush, but weaves this into a narrative with a fictional doctor, Simon Jordan, who is researching the case.

The story begins with Grace, the convicted (and notorious) murderess, being hired out from prison as a domestic servant to the Governor of the penitentiary. Members of the Methodist church (including the minister) are hoping to see Grace pardoned and released, believing that she is suffering from hysteria. The minister asks Dr Jordan, a psychiatrist, to interview her, hoping that he will conclude she is mentally ill, rather than a criminal. As Dr Jordan begins his interviews with Grace, she decides to tell him her life story, including things that happened in childhood and on her traumatic passage from Ireland. She also tells him of her friendship with Mary Whitney, of her meeting with James McDermott, and her relationship with Nancy Montgomery (and Nancy’s relationship with Thomas Kinnear). Dr Jordan is somewhat impatient with her story at first, as he wants to focus on the events of the murder, but Grace’s story draws both him and the reader in, revealing that this is a book about a woman’s life, not just a violent crime.

Alias Grace was adapted as a miniseries for TV in 2017, with Sarah Gadon as Grace Marks and Edward Holcroft as Dr Simon Jordan.

The Fourth Estate by Jeffrey Archer

I chose the next book on today’s list because I felt like it captures a particular mid-90s concern. Not that the concern has gone away, of course, but this 90s iteration is like a precursor to the current climate. I’m talking about anxieties around press ownership and impartiality, and the role media empires play in influencing political and social change.

Archer’s novel tells the story of two media barons. One of these is Lubji Hoch, the son of an illiterate Czech Jewish peasant, who escapes the Nazis, changes his name to Richard Armstrong and becomes an officer in the British Army. After WWII, Hoch (now Armstrong) is posted to Berlin and ends up acquiring his first newspaper – and from here he begins to builds a publishing empire. The novel’s other central character is Keith Townsend, the son of an Australian millionaire and newspaper owner. Townsend is groomed as his father’s successor from childhood, being educated at private school and Oxford, and then given a position at a London newspaper – and from there he becomes the leading newspaper publisher in Australia. Armstrong and Townsend become fierce competitors – but will there be tragic consequences?

As the story is based on two real-life media barons – Robert Maxwell and Rupert Murdoch – we, perhaps, might know the answer to that. In reality, Murdoch bought The Sun, News of the World and later Times Newspapers Ltd, and Maxwell bought the Daily Mirror its group. Archer’s novel was written and published after Maxwell’s death, but it reflects back on the period in the 1980s when the two men’s empires dominate newspaper publising. The novel’s title refers to the concept of the ‘fourth estate’: the press is meant to serve as a watch on other three estates (Lords Spiritual, Lords Temporal and Commons). But, as we were beginning to seriously ask in the mid-90s: who will watch the watchmen?

Popcorn by Ben Elton

In a similar way to The Fourth Estate, Elton’s Popcorn reflects a very current anxiety of the mid-90s – which hasn’t really gone away. It’s a book about violence in popular culture, and the worry that representations of violence can encourage people to act in violent (even murderous) ways. It shares this concern with other 90s texts, particularly Oliver Stone’s Natural Born Killers.

Popcorn is set in L.A. (mostly Hollywood), in the unspecified near future. It’s the story of Bruce Delamitri, who makes violent films and is constantly called to defend against the claim that his films make violence look cool. Unfortunately, Delamitri’s defence is weakened when Wayne and Scout, two psychopaths known as the ‘Mall Murderers’, hatch a plan to hold him hostage and make him publicly announce that his films are responsible for their crimes. The novel build to a climactic siege at Delamitri’s house, with Wayne making a bold offer to the watching audience. Arguably, the commentary in Popcorn is even more pointed than in Natural Born Killers, with some direct discussion of personal responsibility and what a ‘blame free society’ might mean. The last line of the book is pretty direct in this respect!

The book wasn’t made into a film, but Elton adapted it into a play in 1998.

Bridget Jones’s Diary by Helen Fielding

This next book, though, was most definitely made into a film! Fielding’s wildly successful second novel (based on a column she had been writing for The Independent) was published in hardback in 1996 – though, admittedly, the real success came the following year with the release of the paperback edition. It’s credited with kickstarting the boom in chick lit.

Bridget Jones’s Diary is, in essence, an epistolary novel – as the title suggests, it’s written in the form of a diary, and the story is told through twelve chapters (one for each month), beginning with a list of New Year’s resolutions. Bridget lists her intended calories intake, alcohol consumption, weight loss and personal goals, and then each subsequent chapter notes how well she’s done that month. In many ways, this personal critique and impossible ambition to be ‘good’ was the book’s defining feature – but in other ways, it was the romantic storyline that characterized it. Bridget meets a man named Mark Darcy, a wealthy lawyer that her parents like, but she’s not initially enthused. Instead, she ends up dating her boss Daniel Cleaver, who’s charming but unreliable. Will Bridget choose the right man? Or should she focus on her career? Will she finally reach her ideal dress size? (These are the questions that kept readers hooked.

I probably don’t need to say that Bridget Jones’s Diary was adapted into a film in 2001, starring Renee Zellweger, Colin Firth and Hugh Grant. Fielding wrote two sequels to her original novel: Bridget Jones: The Edge of Reason (1999) and Bridget Jones: Mad About the Boy (2013).

The Runaway Jury by John Grisham

The next book on my list is also well-known from its film adaptation – though note, the book’s title has a sneaky definite article that was dropped for the film. I must admit a slightly unorthodox reason for including this title on the list – I’ve added it because I do really love the film!

Grisham’s novel, as you might expect, is set in the world of the courtroom. Celeste Wood, whose husband has died of lung cancer, has filed a suit against a tobacco company, Pynex. She’s hired lawyer Wendall Rohr and his team, who has decided that the trial should be held in Biloxi, Mississippi, because they believe that state has favourable tort laws and sympathetic juries. But it’s going to take more than that for Rohr to win the case… various parties are acting behind the scenes to influence the outcome. First up, there’s ‘stealth juror’ Nicholas Easter, who’s plotting something with a woman called Marlee. And then there’s Rankin Fitch, some sort of consultant who ‘directs’ trials, and has a good track record of getting the tobacco industry off the hook in similar trials. Fitch’s brand of ‘consultancy’ involves rigging and manipulating the jury through blackmail and bribery. Will he be able to deliver the verdict Pynex wants? And what result do Easter and Marlee want?

The book was adapted (without the ‘the’) into a film in 2003, which starred John Cusack as Nick Easter, Gene Hackman as Rankin Fitch, Dustin Hoffman as Wendell Rohr, and Rachel Weisz as Marlee. In many ways, the adaptation was pretty faithful, but the film switched the tobacco industry for a gun manufacturer.

Speaking of adaptations…

A Game of Thrones by George R.R. Martin

Well, what can I say about the final book on today’s list (except look! another article that was dropped for the adaptation!)? If you’re only familiar with the HBO TV series, you may have been surprised to Martin’s novel on this list, but the first novel in the A Song of Ice and Fire series was indeed first published in 1996 though it only became an NYT bestseller in 2011. The book series so far goes: A Game of Thrones (1996), A Clash of Kings (1999), A Storm of Swords (2000), A Feast for Crows (2005), A Dance with Dragons (2011), The Winds of Winter (forthcoming) and A Dream of Spring (forthcoming).

Although A Game of Thrones didn’t hit all the best-seller lists right away, it did win a number of awards and was very popular in SFF circles. The first book in the series introduced three principal storylines that would run through the series. I doubt there’s anyone who wants to know, but doesn’t, that the book introduces the Seven Kingdoms; Eddard (‘Ned’) Stark, lord of the North; the Lannisters; Ned’s daughter Sansa; King Robert Baratheon (who overthrew the ‘mad king’) and his son Joffrey; Queen Cersei Lannister and her twin brother Jaime Lannister. And also the Wall (an ancient barrier of stone, ice and magic); the Night’s Watch; Jon Snow, the illegitimate son of Eddard Stark; the exiled prince Viserys Targaryen, son of the ‘mad king’ and his 13-year-old sister Daenerys; Khal Drogo and the nomadic Dothraki. Martin’s series earned him the soubriquet of the ‘American Tolkien’, but the series’ focus on political intrigue, machinations and moral grey areas definitely differentiate it from Tolkien’s Middle Earth.

As if you need me to tell you, A Games of Thrones was adapted for TV (without the ‘a’) in an HBO series that was broadcast from 2011-2019.

To hear more about all of these books, and my reasons for choosing them, you can catch the show again on the player here:

October 6, 2020

North Manchester FM: Hannah’s Bookshelf, Saturday 10 October, 2-4pm

Join me on Saturday at 2pm on North Manchester FM for more News, Reviews and Short Interviews on Hannah’s Bookshelf. Here’s what’s coming up on this week’s show…

An interview with Simon Bestwick I first interviewed Simon way back in July 2015. Simon was born in Wolverhampton, bred in Manchester, and now lives on the Wirral while pining for Wales. He is the author of six novels, four full-length short story collections and and has been four times shortlisted for the British Fantasy Award. His latest book is the short story collection And Cannot Come Again, and his new novella, Roth-Steyr, will be out in October from Black Shuck Books. In case you’re curious, Simon’s Apocalypse Books choices were Ray Bradbury’s The October Country, Joel Lane’s Where Furnaces Burn, and The Therapy of Avram Blok by Simon Louvish.

A review of a new novel by Ian McGuire I’ll be talking about McGuire’s latest novel, The Abstainer, which was published by Scribner in September.

A review of a new collection of horror stories… I’ll be reviewing The Third BHF Book of Horror Stories, edited by Darrell Buxton, which was published in August with all proceeds being donated to the NHS.

An interview with C.J. Harter I first interviewed C.J. in August last year. C.J. Harter writes dark psychological suspense that belies her sunny nature. In her day job, she helps folk connect with their creativity through writing, and assists authors on their journeys to publication with her editing and proofreading services. She is currently working on a new crime series of novels set in and around Manchester. And in case you were wondering, C.J.’s choices for Apocalypse Books were Van Gogh by Pierre Cabanne, The Geek’s Guide to Having Fun with Morse Code by Dan Romanchik, and The Nation’s Favourite Poems.

Plus… you can hear my weekly round-up of news from the World of Words. If you’ve got a news story you’d like to share, please use the News Form to submit it to the show. For review requests, please get in touch via the Contact Form.

Catch Hannah’s Bookshelf on Saturday at 2pm on 106.6FM (if you’re in the North Manchester area) or listen online (if you’re further afield).

Missed the show? You can catch it again here:

October 6, 2020

3 Minute Scares is back for its fifth fantastic year!

North Manchester FM presenter Hannah Kate wants your scary stories for Halloween! She’s asking people throughout Greater Manchester to submit their 3-minute stories for her annual creative writing competition. Writers keen to be crowned Greater Manchester’s Spookiest Wordsmith can submit a recording of their mini-tale via Hannah’s website, with the best entries being broadcast on the Halloween edition of Hannah’s Bookshelf on Saturday 31st October.

This year’s 3 Minute Scares competition will be judged by horror writer Simon Bestwick, with the writer of the best entry receiving a bundle of books from the wonderful folk at Lyall’s Bookshop, Todmorden. Entries need to be 3 minutes long, meaning a word count of around 350-400 words. The judges will be looking for style and originality, as well as how scary the story is. The deadline for entries is Friday 23rd October, at midnight.

Last year’s competition was won by Bridie Breen, who impressed the judges with her creepy but rather charming tale. North Manchester FM presenter Hannah Kate says: ‘Bridie’s winning story was really impressive – once again, we were so amazed by how much atmosphere and story writers were able to get into such a short space of time, and it was a pleasure to see the crown pass to Bridie. I’m definitely looking forward to seeing what this year’s competition has to offer.’

All writers need to enter the competition is a computer with a microphone… and a good story. Entries can be recorded via Hannah’s website. More information and rules of the competition, including information for people unable to submit a recording, can also be found on the website.

October 1, 2020

North Manchester FM: Hannah’s Bookshelf, Saturday 3 October, 2-4pm

Join me on Saturday at 2pm on North Manchester FM for more News, Reviews and Short Interviews on Hannah’s Bookshelf. Here’s what’s coming up on this week’s show…

An interview with Elizabeth Ducie I first interviewed Elizabeth in August last year. Elizabeth had been working in the international pharmaceutical industry for more than 30 years when she decided to give it all up and start telling lies for a living. Her first four novels were, unsurprisingly, set in such varied locations as Southern Africa, Latin America and Russia; but now she’s bringing it much closer to home, writing a cosy murder mystery set in a fictional village just up the road from her home in South Devon. She also writes and coaches on business skills for authors. And, in case you’re curious, Elizabeth’s Apocalypse Books selections were The Self-Sufficiency Bible by Simon Dawson, Jostein Gaarder’s The Christmas Mystery, and George R.R. Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire.

A review of a new novella by Shona Kinsella you heard Shona and I talking about The Flame and the Flood a couple of weeks ago on the show, and so this week I’ll be reviewing it.

A review of a new novel by Jaime Lee Moyer I’ll be reviewing Divine Heretic, a reimagining of the story of Joan of Arc, which was published in August by Jo Fletcher Books.

And a review of another show in the Homemakers at HOME series… I’ll be taking about A Series of Metaphors About a Plague, one of the performances created for the Homemakers series.

Plus… you can hear my weekly round-up of news from the World of Words. If you’ve got a news story you’d like to share, please use the News Form to submit it to the show. For review requests, please get in touch via the Contact Form.

Catch Hannah’s Bookshelf on Saturday at 2pm on 106.6FM (if you’re in the North Manchester area) or listen online (if you’re further afield).

Missed the show? You can catch it again there:

September 23, 2020

North Manchester FM: Hannah’s Bookshelf, Saturday 26 September, 2-4pm

Join me on Saturday at 2pm on North Manchester FM for more News, Reviews and Short Interviews on Hannah’s Bookshelf. Here’s what’s coming up on this week’s show…

A review of a forthcoming poetry collection by John Birtwhistle I’ll be reviewing In the Event, Birtwhistle’s new collection of poetry, which will be published by Carcanet this October.

An interview Ged Austin I first interviewed Ged Austin in February 2019. Ged is a Mancunian poet, author, playwright, actor, local historian, art director and curator. He’s also a homelessness outreach worker and fundraiser, the co-director of the Manchester Indie Filmmakers Group, and a spiritual life coach. And in case you’re curious, Ged’s Apocalypse Books choices were The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum, The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson, and J. Krishnamurti’s Freedom from the Known.

A review of a new book by Jack Barrow you heard us talking about In SatNav We Trust a couple of weeks ago on the show

And an interview with Rosa Wright I first interviewed Rosa Wright in October 2018. Rosa is a poet, performer and professional weirdo based in Salford, UK. She was featured as a spoken word artist in the Manchester Open 2020 and her solo show The Love Calculator was nominated for Best Spoken Word at the Manchester Fringe in 2018. Her first ebook For All My Mothers is available on Amazon. And in case you’re wondering, Rosa’s selections for Apocalypse Books were Shooting an Elephant and Other Essays by George Orwell, Howl’s Moving Castle by Diana Wynne Jones, and This is How by Augusten Burroughs.

Plus… you can hear my weekly round-up of news from the World of Words. If you’ve got a news story you’d like to share, please use the News Form to submit it to the show. For review requests, please get in touch via the Contact Form.

Catch Hannah’s Bookshelf on Saturday at 2pm on 106.6FM (if you’re in the North Manchester area) or listen online (if you’re further afield).

Missed the show? You can catch it again here:

September 13, 2020

North Manchester FM: Hannah’s Bookshelf (Not Quite) Live Poetry Special, Saturday 19 September, 2-4pm

Join me on Saturday 19th September, 2-4pm, for my annual Hannah’s Bookshelf Live Poetry Special on North Manchester FM. Except, of course, this year we’ll be Not Quite Live… but I’ve still got 12 amazing poets lined up to perform their work for you (they just won’t all in the same room, and none of us will be within 2 metres of each other). Check out who’s going to be on the show…

Ged Austin
Ged Austin is a Mancunian poet, author, playwright, actor, local historian, art director and curator. He’s also a homelessness outreach worker and fundraiser, the co-director of the Manchester Indie Filmmakers Group, and a spiritual life coach.

 

 

Martin Grey
Martin Grey is a Nottingham based performance poet. His debut collection, The Prettyboys of Gangster Town, was released in 2020 through Fly on the Wall Poetry. He is also a director of World Jam, a global poetry and music charity, and eats far too many custard creams.

 

 

Pete Slater
Pete Slater is an art school dropout from the 60s, who sort of fell into poetry by accident some 40 years later. He discovered performance poetry at an open mic 6 years ago, and hasn’t stopped writing or performing since. And he’s still writing through the madness of this pandemic and managing to read through the wonder of modern technology.

 

Simon Corble
Simon is a playwright, performer, photographer and poet. He grew up in rural Oxfordshire and Cheshire before training as an actor in Manchester, where he was based for many years before moving to the Peak District in 2007. His collection of poetry and photography, White Light White Peak, was published by Fly on the Wall Press in 2019, along with the launch of his live show, which mixes his performance of the spoken word with projected images and sound recordings from the Peak District.

Rachel Halsall
Rachel Halsall is a 25-year-old writer based in Manchester, which has provided great inspiration for many of her works. She has had multiple publications in anthologies, featured on the radio, and now has a WordPress blog called The Lady Ruthless.

 

 

Bethany Rivers
Bethany Rivers was shortlisted for the Overton Poetry Prize and the Snowdrop Poetry Competition in 2019. She has two poetry pamphlets: Off the Wall from Indigo Dreams (2016) and the sea refuses no river from Fly on the Wall Press (2019). She is the editor of As Above So Below online poetry magazine, and she has taught creative writing for 14 years.

 

Thomas McColl
Thomas McColl has had poems published in magazines such as Envoi, Iota, Prole, International Times and Ink, Sweat & Tears, and his latest collection, Grenade Genie, came out this year with Manchester-based publisher Fly on the Wall Press. Tom’s read his poetry and stories at many events in London and beyond – including Landing Place, Celine’s Salon, The Quiet Compere, Birkbeck Writer’s Room and Newham Word Festival – and has been featured on BBC Radio Kent, East London Radio and TV’s London Live.

Helen Darby
Helen Darby is a queer poet from Manchester who has been appearing at spoken word nights around the North West since 2018. She writes about place, gender, class, recovery, philosophy, sex, isolation and friendship. She has performed invited guest slots at Lancaster Spotlight, That’s What She Said Manchester, Superbia for Manchester Pride, Manchester Museum, New Mills Festival, The Bronte Festival of Women’s Writing, Stirred and She Grrrowls in Edinburgh Free Fringe, amongst others.

Bridie Breen
Bridie Breen is an Irish-born, Manchester-matured poet. She loves the human condition, the good, the bad and the ugly. She writes it as it is, for the joy of getting it down.

 

 

Hallie Fletcher
Hallie Fletcher is a published poet who is currently studying an MA in Literature. She has self-published two books. After falling pregnant at fifteen and growing up in Harpurhey, she has always used writing as her therapy, and her two children inspire her every single day to succeed in life.

 

Amanda Steel
Amanda Steel is the author of several novels and poetry collections, including Ghost of Me and Always Darkest Before Dawn. She also works as a copywriter, and is the co-host of the book review podcast Reading in Bed, which now has a spinoff podcast called Reading in Bed Extracts.

 

Andy N
Andy N is the author of four full-length poetry collections, the most recent being the streets were all we could see and the lockdown was all we could see, co-written with Amanda Steel. He is also the co-host of Stretford’s open mic literature night Speak Easy, does podcasts as varied as Spoken Label, Reading in Bed, Wrestle Talk and Comics Unity, and does ambient music as Ocean in a Bottle.

 

These wonderful writers and performers will all be appearing on this week’s Hannah’s Bookshelf on Saturday from 2pm. You can catch the show on 106.6FM (if you’re in the North Manchester area) or listen online (if you’re further afield).

Missed the show? You can catch it again here:

September 10, 2020

North Manchester FM: Hannah’s Bookshelf, Saturday 12 September, 2-4pm

Join me on Saturday at 2pm on North Manchester FM for more News, Reviews and Short Interviews on Hannah’s Bookshelf. Here’s what’s coming up on this week’s show…

An interview with Sara Read I first interviewed Sara back in April 2016 (and then, as a bonus, I spoke to her again in June 2017 as well). Sara is an academic who specialises in the cultural and literary representations of women, reproduction and medicine in the seventeenth century, and a lecturer in english at Loughborough University. Her debut novel The Gossips’ Choice is out now from Wild Pressed Books.  In case you’re curious, Sara’s Apocalypse Books choices were The Midwives Book by Jane Sharp, Katherine by Anya Seton, and The Eyre Affair by Jasper Fforde.

A review of a new poetry collection from Flapjack Press I’ll be talking about The Beauty Within Shadow, a new collection by Henry Normal, which was published this month by Flapjack Press.

An interview with Shona Kinsella My first interview with Shona Kinsella was back in October 2017. Shona is the author of stone age fantasy Ashael Rising, dark Scottish fantasy Petra MacDonald and the Queen of the Fae, and industrial fantasy The Flame and the Flood. She’s the editor of the British Fantasy Society’s fiction publication, BFS Horizons, as well as lead judge for the BFS Short Story Competition. She lives on the beautiful banks of Loch Lomond with her husband and three children. And, in case you’re interested, her Apocalypse Books choices were Stephen King’s IT, Magician by Raymond E. Feist, and Karin Slaughter’s Blindsighted.

Reviews of two radio plays from JustOut Theatre I’ve chosen two more plays from the JustOut Stays In radio play series to talk about on this week’s show: ‘I am the most coldhearted son of a b*tch you will ever meet’ by Issy Flower and ‘Qualified’ by Lee Thompson.

Plus… you can hear my weekly round-up of news from the World of Words. If you’ve got a news story you’d like to share, please use the News Form to submit it to the show. For review requests, please get in touch via the Contact Form.

Catch Hannah’s Bookshelf on Saturday at 2pm on 106.6FM (if you’re in the North Manchester area) or listen online (if you’re further afield).

Missed the show? You can catch it again here:

September 2, 2020

North Manchester FM: Hannah’s Bookshelf, Saturday 5 September, 2-4pm

Join me on Saturday at 2pm on North Manchester FM for more News, Reviews and Short Interviews on Hannah’s Bookshelf. Here’s what’s coming up on this week’s show…

A review of a book by Jennifer Nansubuga Makumbi I’ll be reviewing Manchester Happened, a short story collection by award-winning author Jennifer Nansubuga Makumbi (published by Oneworld Publications).

Reviews of two radio plays from JustOut Theatre I’ve chosen two more plays from the JustOut Stays In radio play series to talk about on this week’s show: Bleach by Max Kyte and Mrs O’Connor’s Flute by Suzan Young.

An interview with Jack Barrow I first interviewed Jack Barrow in April 2019. Jack lives in Hertfordshire, where he earns a living writing about things in engineering. He’s written a novel about master magicians who save the world at weekends, and his travelogue In SatNav We Trust was published in 2020. In case you’re curious, Jack’s Apocalypse Books choices were The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance by Robert M. Pirsig, and The Road to Little Dribbling by Bill Bryson.

And a review of a book by Susan Barrett You heard us talking about Elfrida Next Door on last week’s show, and so this week I’ll be reviewing it for you!

Plus… you can hear my weekly round-up of news from the World of Words. If you’ve got a news story you’d like to share, please use the News Form to submit it to the show. For review requests, please get in touch via the Contact Form.

Catch Hannah’s Bookshelf on Saturday at 2pm on 106.6FM (if you’re in the North Manchester area) or listen online (if you’re further afield).

Missed the show? You can catch it again here:

August 26, 2020

North Manchester FM: Hannah’s Bookshelf, Saturday 29 August, 2-4pm

Join me on Saturday at 2pm on North Manchester FM for more News, Reviews and Short Interviews on Hannah’s Bookshelf. Here’s what’s coming up on this week’s show…

An interview with Susan Barrett I first interviewed Susan in March 2019. Susan Barrett is an experienced writer of fiction and non-fiction whose work has been published since the 1960s. Elfrida Next Door is her 12th novel, and the fifth she has brought out independently. Susan is married to wildlife artist Peter Barrett. They live in Devon near their daughter, grandchildren and great-grandchildren. And in case you were wondering, Susan’s Apocalypse Books selections were Cider with Rosie by Laurie Lee, True History of the Kelly Gang by Peter Carey, and the Complete Works of Shakespeare.

A review of a book from Queen of Swords Press I’ll be reviewing Scourge of the Seas of Time (and Space), an pirate-themed short story anthology, edited by Catherine Lundoff and published by Queen of Swords in 2018.

Reviews of two radio plays from JustOut Theatre I’ve chosen two more plays from the JustOut Stays In radio play series to talk about on this week’s show: Total Slag by Sophie A. Mitchell and To Tell You the Truth by Daniel Kearney.

And I’ll be talking about a short film from HOME I’ll be talking about Last Place on Earth, an interactive, 360-degree film by HOME Manchester’s Future 20 Collective in collaboration with Studio Morison.

Plus… you can hear my weekly round-up of news from the World of Words. If you’ve got a news story you’d like to share, please use the News Form to submit it to the show. For review requests, please get in touch via the Contact Form.

Catch Hannah’s Bookshelf on Saturday at 2pm on 106.6FM (if you’re in the North Manchester area) or listen online (if you’re further afield).

Missed the show? You can catch it again here: