Hannah Kate

poet, short story writer and editor based in Manchester

March 24, 2019

North Manchester FM: Hannah’s Bookshelf, Saturday 30 March, 2-4pm

Join me on Saturday at 2pm for another Hannah’s Bookshelf on North Manchester FM. This week, my guest will be the lovely Pamela Turton.

At the age of six, Pamela was already writing proper stories, all essentially medieval romances. She was spurred on by winning a prize in a Brooke Bond (the Tea Company) creative writing competition a few years later. Being mocked by Big Sister for waking up in the middle of the night to scribble poetry, and brought to the Headmaster’s office for using the word ‘voluptuous’ in a poem she submitted to the Catholic primary school magazine did not deter her.

Member of a huge Northern tribe, Manchester native, mum and teacher-turned-author, Pamela has now published five novels: So Sister, Selling Short, The Life Coach Less Travelled, Blue is the Object and Stalkbook, as well as poetry and non-fiction.

I’ll be talking to Pamela about her novels, poetry and other writing on this week’s show. And, of course, she’ll be sharing her selections for this week’s Apocalypse Books.

Catch the show on Saturday at 2pm on 106.6FM (if you’re in the North Manchester area) or listen online (if you’re further afield).

March 24, 2019

North Manchester FM: A Helping of History, Tuesday 26 March, 12-2pm

Join me on Tuesday at 12 on North Manchester FM for another Helping of History. I’ve got two fantastic (though very different!) interviews for you on this week’s show.

In the first hour, I’ll be talking to author Denise Beddows about her latest book, The Cheetham Hill Murder: A Convenient Killing? The book reexamines the case of the murder of Frances Levin in 1933. Sparking what was described as Manchester CID’s ‘biggest manhunt’, the murder of Mrs Levin shocked the community of Cheetham Hill at the time. The police identified a homeless man William Burtoft as a likely suspect, and he was eventually tried and executed for the crime. However, as the BBC’s Murder, Mystery and My Family show revealed last year, it’s unlikely Burtoft could have committed the crime. Denise’s book picks up the story, reexamines the evidence, and pieces together the real story of what happened on that July afternoon in 1933.

I’ll be chatting to Denise on the show about the book, and about what inspired her to look into this particular case.

And then in the second hour, I’ll be talking to Sam Jenkins of the People’s History Museum about the new exhibition: Disrupt? Peterloo and Protest. This exhibition takes visitors through the past, present and future of protest, beginning with the story of the Peterloo Massacre, which is told through original artefacts. PHM’s collection, newly acquired pieces, donations and loan items are brought together for the first time, some never having been on public display before, to tell this story in the year of the 200th anniversary of the Peterloo Massacre in The National Lottery Heritage Fund supported exhibition.

I visited the exhibition and talked to Sam about the pieces on display, the story they reveal, and the ways this new exhibition interacts with the longer history of protest and demonstration – not only in Manchester, but across the globe.

Of course, as well as these two fantastic guests, I’ll also be taking my usual look through Yesterday’s Papers on the show.

Catch A Helping of History on Tuesday at 12 on 106.6FM (if you’re in the North Manchester area) or listen online (if you’re further afield).

March 18, 2019

North Manchester FM: Hannah’s Bookshelf, Saturday 23 March, 2-4pm

Join me on Saturday at 2pm for another Hannah’s Bookshelf on North Manchester FM. This week, my guest will be the wonderful Susan Barrett.

Susan started writing fiction in the 1960s. Her first seven novels were published by mainstream publishers in the UK and the US. She and her husband, wildlife artist Peter Barrett, have co-authored a number of natural history and children’s books. Their most recent work together is a memoir of their early life in Greece, illustrated with over 200 black and white photographs taken at the time, and Peter’s line drawings. The Garden of the Grandfather: Life in Greece in the 1960s was independently published in October 2018. Susan’s last three fiction titles were self-published as eBooks and in paperback. Susan knows well the advantages and pitfalls of the indie world in the present publishing climate.

I’ll be talking to Susan about her long-standing writer career, and about her recent publications. And, of course, she’ll be sharing her selections for this week’s Apocalypse Books.

Catch the show on Saturday at 2pm on 106.6FM (if you’re in the North Manchester area) or listen online (if you’re further afield).

Missed the show? You can catch it again here:

March 18, 2019

North Manchester FM: A Helping of History, Tuesday 19 March, 12-2pm

Join me on Tuesday at 12 for another Helping of History on North Manchester FM. This week, I’m taking a closer look at the history of Newton Heath.

Specifically, I’m taking a look at a book about the history of Newton Heath: H.T. Crofton’s A History of the Newton Chapelry in the Ancient Parish of Manchester, including Sketches of the Townships of Newton with Kirkmanshulme, Failsworth and Bradford, but Exclusive of the Townships of Droylsden and Moston (Chetham Society, 1904). Quite the mouthful, eh?

It’s surprising that I haven’t read Crofton’s History of the Newton Chapelry before. The equivalent history book for Blackley by Rev. John Booker (which Crofton references in his own work) has been an invaluable source for me, and I’ve referred to it a few times on the show. However, while Booker’s Blackley is generally a rather formal survey of the churchs and halls of the township, Crofton’s Newton reveals a different side to North Manchester life. While he gives sufficient time to the power families and landowners who owned Newton, Crofton also spends a bit of time outlining some of the quirkier tales of Newton Heath’s past.

On this week’s show, I’ll be sharing some of my favourite bits of Crofton’s book. Tune in to the show if you want to find out… where Monkey House was… how Scutch Buttock got its name… why Rev Matthew Sedgwick was known as ‘muscular Christian’… and all about the bizarre portraits that once hung in Culcheth Hall.

In addition to this wander through Crofton’s Newton Heath, I’ll also be taking my usual look through Yesterday’s Papers.

Catch the show on Tuesday at 12 on 106.6FM (if you’re in the North Manchester area) or listen online (if you’re further afield).

Missed the show? You can catch it again here:

March 14, 2019

North Manchester FM: Hannah’s Bookshelf, Saturday 16 March, 2-4pm

Join me on Saturday at 2pm on North Manchester FM for another special edition of Hannah’s Bookshelf. This week, I’m reporting on the 25th anniversary celebrations of the Manchester Irish Writers.

The Manchester Irish Writers was founded in 1994 at the old Irish World Heritage Centre and has been meeting regularly since. It was co-founded by Alrene Hughes and Rose Morris. MIW is a very enthusiastic group of ambitious writers at various stages in their development. Encouraged by Alrene and other visiting writers, members have gained enormously in confidence leading to the publication of six books of their collected writings. As well as providing focused workshops the group meetings have become very special social occasions where much pleasure is derived from sharing thoughts, ideas and memories.

Their publications to date include: At the End of the Rodden (Scribhneoiri 1997), The Retting Dam (Scribhneoiri 2001), Stone of the Heart (Scribhneoiri 2002), Drawing Breath (Scribhneoiri 2003), From Kerry Child to Limerick Lady (Scribhneoiri 2003) and Changing Skies (Scribhneoiri 2014). Their performances include: poetry, one act plays and monologues staged annually in the Manchester Irish Festival, the Chorlton Festival and Oldham Festival, Library Theatre, Royal Exchange and The Thirsty Scholar. A number of the writers have had books published and plays staged at The Lowry, Kings Arms, Oldham Colosseum, and London theatres.

The Manchester Irish Writers meet fortnightly on the second and fourth Thursday of each month at 7.30pm, and new members are always welcome.

On Thursday 14th March, the Manchester Irish Writers celebrate their 25th anniversary with a night of performance, readings, music and dance at the Irish World Heritage Centre, North Manchester. I’ll be reporting on the event on this week’s show, with interviews from some of the group’s members, including:

Suzanne Jeans

Suzanne was born and brought up on the Wirral and worked for over 30 years in the North West of England, teaching Drama and Theatre Studies at GCSE and A Level. Suzanne took early retirement in 2017 and joined the MIW group just 12 months ago. So far, she has written a short story and a play.

Patrick Slevin

Patrick lives in Stockport. His poems have appeared in The Interpreter’s House, The Manchester Review, Degenerate Literature, The Bangor Literature Review and The Cabinet of Heed. He has been highly recommended in the Westival Poetry Prize 2018, the Westport Poetry Competion 2017 and the Gregory O’Donogue Poetry Prize 2017.

Kevin McMahon

Kevin is a poet and playwright. He’s the writer of The Claykickers’ Chorus, which was the winning script in the Kenneth Branagh International Drama Writing Award 2018.

Rose Morris

Rose Morris co-founded the Manchester Irish Writers group with Alrene Hughes in 1994 and reckons that her continued involvement, affirmation and sharing within the group has greatly enhanced the development of her own writing. Her monologues have been performed at the Library Theatre and the Royal Exchange, and her short stories and poetry have been published in the Manchester Irish Writers’ collections: The End of the Rodden, The Retting Dam, Stone of the Heart, Drawing Breath and Changing Skies, and in Something About Home (edited by Liam Harte).

Catch all these interviews – and much more! – on the Hannah’s Bookshelf Manchester Irish Writers Special this Saturday at 2pm on 106.6FM (if you’re in the North Manchester area) or listen online (if you’re further afield).

Missed the show? You can catch it again here:

March 6, 2019

North Manchester FM: Hannah’s Bookshelf, Saturday 9 March, 2-4pm

Catch Hannah’s Bookshelf this Saturday at 2pm on North Manchester FM. This week’s show is jam-packed with interviews, as I’m reporting on Thursday’s That’s What She Said event in Manchester, presented by For Book’s Sake.

That’s What She Said is a monthly spoken word night for women, featuring iconic and emerging authors with a mix of performance, poetry, storytelling, slam and more. The March event is on Thursday 7th (just before International Women’s Day), and I’ll be there to chat to the organizers and performers, including…

Jane Bradley: Jane is the founder and director of For Books’ Sake, the UK non-profit dedicated to championing women and non-binary writers. She is a writer and performer and has been longlisted for the Lucy Cavendish Prize for Fiction and a Young Enigma Award.

Hafsah Aneela Bashir: Hafsah is a poet, playwright and performer based in Manchester who is passionate about platforming voices often absent from the mainstream. Co-director Of Outside The Frame Arts collective with theatre maker Nikki Mailer, she works within the community using arts as a tool for social change. She is also a mother to five beautiful beings with all the challenges, joy and despair that come with motherhood.

Stefanie Moore: Stefanie is a regional tap dance champion (North East Lincolnshire, 1994) who currently lives in Manchester. She is a graduate of the Write Like a Grrrl Programme and her writing credits include Dear Damsels, 100 Voices for 100 Years and The Cabinet of Heed. She was longlisted for the Mslexia Short Story Competition 2018 and won the Hive Award for 2019, which means that, along with being mentored by Tim Firth, her debut play Blue Lines will be produced for the Greater Manchester Fringe in July.

Gaynor Jones: Gaynor is an award-winning short fiction writer based in Manchester.

But that’s not all… this week, I’ll also be reporting on the launch of Practising Place, a new publication which explores our relationship with places through a collection of creative projects and conversations between artists and academics. Edited by Elaine Speight, the publication includes creative explorations of places across the north of England – including a Cumbrian Center Parcs resort, Stanlow Oil Refinery, working-men’s clubs, Manchester Central Library and the edgelands of Preston and Sheffield, as well as more general themes, such as urban planning and digital space. I’ll be attending the launch of this fascinating new book on Thursday 7th March, and talking to the editor and contributors for this week’s show.

You can catch all of this on Saturday at 2pm on 106.6FM (if you’re in the North Manchester area) or listen online (if you’re further afield).

Missed the show? You can catch it again here:

March 3, 2019

North Manchester FM: A Helping of History, Tuesday 5 March, 12-2pm

Join me on Tuesday at 12 on North Manchester FM for another Helping of History. This week, I’m going to be talking theatres with Claire Appleby of Theatres Trust.

The Theatres Trust 2019 Theatres at Risk register was published in January. This list outlines the UK theatre buildings that are under threat or at risk of demolition, closure or lack of maintenance. These buildings may be in use as theatres, in other use, vacant or derelict. Some have listed building status, but others haven’t. Theatres Trust believe that these buildings have an important place in the local history of their surrounding areas, but also (and perhaps more significantly) that they have a vital role to play in the future of their communities and town centres.

I’ll be talking about the Theatres at Risk register with Claire from Theatres Trust on the show, to find out more about these important buildings. In particular, I’ll be chatting to Claire about two of the Greater Manchester buildings on the list that get regular mentions on A Helping of History – the Theatre Royal in central Manchester and the Victoria Theatre in Broughton (with a bit about the Save the Victoria Theatre group’s work as well).

In addition to my interview with Claire, I’ll also be taking my usual look through Yesterday’s Papers in the second hour of the show.

Catch A Helping of History on Tuesday at 12 on 106.6FM (if you’re in the North Manchester area) or listen online (if you’re further afield).

Missed the show? You can catch it again here:

February 24, 2019

North Manchester FM: Hannah’s Bookshelf, Saturday 2 March, 2-4pm

Join me on Saturday at 2pm for another episode of Hannah’s Bookshelf on North Manchester FM. This week, my guest will be the fantastic Antony Rowland.

Antony has published three poetry collections: The Land of Green Ginger (Salt, 2008) – which was shortlisted for the Michael Murphy Award – I Am a Magenta Stick (Salt, 2012), and M (Arc, 2017). He was awarded the 10K Manchester Poetry Prize in 2012, and his poems have been anthologised in Identity Parade: New British and Irish Poets (Bloodaxe, 2010), and New Poetries III (Carcanet, 2003). He received an Eric Gregory Award from the Society of Authors in 2000, and recorded for the national Poetry Archive in 2009, and the Lyrikline (Berlin) in 2014. The Dutch government elected him as a UK poetry ‘ambassador’ for 2016: his poetry was read on national television, and shown on screens at Schipol airport and Amsterdam Central Station. In 2018, the poem ‘Newark’ from M was shortlisted for the Forward Prize for Best Single Poem, and was published in The Forward Book of Poetry 2019.

I’ll be talking to Antony about his writing and publications on this week’s show. And, of course, he’ll be sharing his selections for this week’s Apocalypse Books.

Catch the show on Saturday at 2 on 106.6FM (if you’re in the North Manchester area) or listen online (if you’re further afield).

Missed the show? You can catch it again here:

February 24, 2019

North Manchester FM: A Helping of History, Tuesday 26 February, 12-2pm

Join me on Tuesday at 12 for another Helping of History on North Manchester FM. This week’s show is a bit of content catch-up (in case you missed it).

There’s another chance to hear my interview with Katrina Navickas about open spaces, radical protest and Cropper Street, Collyhurst. And in the second hour of the show, you can hear my review of a brand new play that was staged at 53two, Deansgate.

As well as all this, I’ll be taking my usual look through Yesterday’s Papers!

Catch the show on Tuesday at 12 on 106.6FM (if you’re in the North Manchester area) or listen online (if you’re further afield).

Missed the show? You can catch it again here:

February 16, 2019

North Manchester: A Helping of History, Tuesday 19 February, 12-2pm

Join me for another Helping of History on North Manchester FM this Tuesday at 12. I’ve got two fantastic interviews lined up for this week’s show, about two really great projects looking at the history and stories of our local area.

In the first hour of the show, I’ll be talking to historian Katrina Navickas about her current project: A History of Public Space. In particular, Katrina will be talking about one of the North Manchester case studies in the project – Cropper Street (now Osborne Street) on the border of Collyhurst and Miles Platting. Is this Manchester’s most radical street? Katrina will be talking about this on the show, and also asking for people to share their Osborne Street stories as part of the project.

And then in the second hour of the show, I’ll be talking to Julian Hill of Foundland Theatre and Manchester Playwrights Forum about an exciting new participatory theatre project for Moston and Harpurhey. The project’s working title is ‘Our Life’, and Julian is looking to involve looking people in the research and development of this new theatre production that will draw on the stories and histories of Moston and Harpurhey communities. Find out more – including how to get involved – on Tuesday’s show.

In addition to these two wonderful interviews, I’ll also be taking my usual look through Yesterday’s Papers on the show.

Catch the show on Tuesday at 12 on 106.6FM (if you’re in the North Manchester area) or listen online (if you’re further afield).

Missed the show? You can catch it again here: